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The Voice of the Black Community

Arts and Entertainment

Five things you should know about Anthony Hamilton
R&B star opens up on music and career
 
Published Wednesday, April 6, 2016 4:30 pm
by Herbert L. White

COURTESY PHOTO
Charlotte native Anthony Hamilton hasn’t forgotten home despite a string of successful albums and a Grammy Award. His new album, “What I’m Feelin,’” debuted last month.

Anthony Hamilton hasn’t gone all big-time.


The Grammy-winning vocalist still calls Charlotte home and shops at the supermarket like most of us. But most of us aren’t one of R&B music’s grandest stars, collaborating with the likes of Al Green (their 2009 single You’ve Got the Love I Need” earned a Grammy), Buddy Guy, Keyshia Cole, Eve and Jill Scott, selling more than 35 million units.


Hamilton’s been busy since his first album, “Coming From Where I’m From,” dropped in 2003. His fifth album, “What I’m Feelin,’” debuted last month, and a corresponding 15-city national tour with RCA Records label mate Fantasia kicks off April 19.  Here’s what Hamilton thinks about adoration, living in Charlotte and his new disc.  


• He adores the love of hometown fans. 

“Some days it’s a rush. Some days you need it. In life, you have your days when you’re high and you’re low, so some days you need that extra love, that extra appreciation. Some days you just want to get into the grocery store, come on out of there with them bags, get in the car and go home, but it’s all love. It’s never a moment of it’s too much that I don’t appreciate it. It’s always an appreciation.”


• He really likes Charlotte. Really.


“Why go away from home when there are so many entertainers who have done it who are not from New York City, who are not from L.A., who are not from any of these big cities? I think talent comes from anywhere; talent can live anywhere. Wherever there’s a plane, a bus or some water where you can get where you’ve got to go, it’s best to go where it feels like home and Charlotte is home.”


• “What I’m Feelin’” is Hamilton’s new album. It debuted last month.


“I think it’s pretty consistent. It has great songs, great lyrical content, subject matter and a sense of urgency within people’s lives. I think we need music that makes us feel like somebody understands who we are and what we are. I’ve been fortunate enough to be consistent with it.”  


• Gospel influence in today’s secular music:

“I think there’s a lot of departure from the church and the spirit of who we are as people in today’s music and it’s more about popularity, spins and album sales. I think hip-hop has utilized the church soul and R&B more than today’s singers with sampling. It’s missed a lot. I think that’s why people hold up to me (like) I’m the last savior.”


• Gospel-infused R&B is alive and well, though.


“But there are so many other singers that bring the same thing. Tyrese – ‘Shane’ was an incredible song. Lyfe Jennings, D’Angelo is still here, Maxwell has that Marvin Gaye churchy thing. Jill Scott, even Eyrikah Badu has a certain Chaka Khan kind of thing. It’s a different thing sonically, but when you hear those voices, you know it came from somewhere, somebody’s mama.” 

Comments

Wow, this is great to hear. He is so right about were you feel happy at and my Soul feels happy being in the South
Posted on April 10, 2016
 

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