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The Force is strong with latest engaging Star Wars attraction
Immersive experience at Walt Disney World
 
Published Friday, December 6, 2019 12:49 pm
by Ashley Mahoney | The Charlotte Post

PHOTO | ASHLEY MAHONEY
The Millennium Falcon at Star Wars Galaxy Edge at Disney's Hollywood Studios in Orlando, Florida.

ORLANDO, Fla. — Rise of the Resistance is perfect for people who do not like amusement park rides.

The latest Walt Disney World Resort attraction offers more of an experience than a ride, and it opened Dec. 5 at Star Wars Galaxy’s Edge at Disney’s Hollywood Studios. It also opens on Jan. 17 in Anaheim, California at Disneyland Park.

Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge opened in May and August in Anaheim and Orlando respectively.

Its 14-plus-acre span marks the largest single-themed expansion in Disney Parks’ history. Rise of the Resistance is the second attraction, joining Millennium Falcon: Smugglers Run. The latter allows guests to fly the infamous Millennium Falcon, making the jump to lightspeed (faster than the speed of light). For those looking for an equally immersive experience but slightly smoother ride, escaping the clutches of the First Order is it.

Fifty First Order Stormtroopers await upon entry to the hangar bay of a Star Destroyer. From a special message from Resistance leader Rey to flying with Lieutenant Bek—a humanoid aquatic species with high-domed heads, webbed hands, and incredibly large eyes—to an engaging in battle alongside Resistance commander Poe Dameron to being captured by the First Order, running from Kylo Ren, supreme leader of the First Order, this attraction is unlike anything Disney has ever done. While it incorporates elements of simulation, in includes multiple physical aspects.

“Star Wars: Rise of the Resistance is the most ambitious, immersive, advanced, action-packed attraction we’ve ever created,” Disney Parks Experiences and Products Chairman Bob Chapek said. “We threw out the rulebook when designing this attraction to deliver experiential storytelling on a massive, cinematic scale. Star Wars: Rise of the Resistance sets a new standard for what a theme park experience can be—just like Galaxy’s Edge itself.”

The release of the original “Star Wars” film in 1977 introduced the world to a life changing galaxy far, far away. Filmmaker George Lucas founded Lucasfilm Ltd. in 1971. Disney acquired the company in 2012, releasing a third trilogy of films, as well as two additional films in the franchise. “Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker,” the third installment of the current trilogy, debuts Dec. 20.

Disney’s first Star Wars attraction arrived in 1987 when Star Tours opened at Disneyland, four years after the release of the final installment of the first trilogy, “Return of the Jedi.” Development for Galaxy’s Edge began in 2014, creating 1,700 new jobs at Hollywood Studios. Construction began in 2016. Inside there’s the first full-size, complete Millennium Falcon, as well as a place to create your own lightsaber—Savi’s Workshop—and your own droid in the Droid Depot, because, these are the droids you are looking for. Over 120,000 potential lightsaber creation combinations await, as well as nearly 280,000 ways to construct a droid. Say hi to old friends and new, like R2-D2.

 

 

 

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