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The Voice of the Black Community

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State of the Union address reaction split among African Americans
President Trump's speech slammed and praised
 
Published Wednesday, February 6, 2019 11:26 am
by Herbert L. White | The Charlotte Post

President Donald Trump.

African American political activists and lawmakers are split on President Donald Trump’s State of the Union address.


Congressional Black Caucus Chair Rep. Karen Bass (D-Calif.) slammed Trump for actions that didn’t match his call for bipartisan comity and compromise on issues from health care insurance to job creation.


“The president again came to the halls of Congress and ironically attempted to push an agenda of unity,” Bass said in a statement.  “He said we should reject the politics of revenge and embrace cooperation on the same day that he taunted the Senate minority leader [Chuck Schumer] on Twitter about election results. Within the first few minutes of his speech, the president touted getting families off of food stamps. He stood there just months after pushing an agenda to eliminate SNAP for families across America.


“He mentioned many anniversaries but failed to mention that it’s the 400th anniversary of our ancestors arriving to this country enslaved. He said he was a defender of health coverage for those with pre-existing conditions, but it was less than two years ago when he pushed to repeal the very law that protects people with those conditions.”


Members of Project 21, an advocacy group of black conservatives, praised Trump’s tone.


“This was an exciting speech," said Dr. Day Gardner, president of the National Black Pro-Life Union. “President Trump continues to show amazing leadership and love for America and devotion to her people. I love that he is fearless in his faith and support for human life. "It was rather comical that many liberals in the chamber couldn't even stand when the president said we have a great country, or when he talked about those who were lifted off food stamps or rescued from sex traffickers. We should all be able to feel good about those things. The president's critics seem very petty and childish to the point of hilarity.”


Trump, who again demanded Congress approve legislation to build a fence along the U.S.-Mexico border, said the barrier would keep Americans safe and protect jobs. He sparked a 35-day partial shutdown of the federal government when he pledged to veto any bill that did not include wall funding. He ultimately relented on a three-week continuing resolution that expires Feb. 15.


“To ensure the health and safety of minority communities, we must employ a physical barrier in conjunction with expanding the ‘virtual’ border technology that uses radar sensors, enhanced drug detection and artificial intelligence,” said Nicole Bennett, a health care professional who specializes on addiction issues.


“Black communities are disproportionately affected by the seemingly endless supply of high-purity, low-cost heroin flooding into our country from our southwestern border and the brutal gangs that control the supply and distribution of heroin, fentanyl and other illicit drugs. The health, welfare and safety of our most vulnerable minority communities are being threatened. By strengthening our southwestern border, we are granting black and minority communities a much-needed reprieve from the onslaught of illicit drugs and gangs.”


Bass took exception to Trump’s claim that his administration engineered a booming economy since taking office. In reality, the nation’s economic health has been on the upswing since his predecessor, Barack Obama, was in office.


“[Trump] brandished unemployment rates as if he had anything to do with them and governmental stability as if he didn’t just cause the longest shutdown in the history of this country,” Bass said.


Akunna Cook, executive director of the Black Economic Alliance, said the economic gap between African Americans and whites is still wide despite record-low unemployment.


“While the unemployment rate among black Americans remains at a historic low, as it was under the Obama administration, it continues to be nearly twice that of Caucasian Americans and two full percentage points higher than that of Hispanic Americans – a fact that we believe is a direct consequence of our government’s failure to prioritize economic policies that empower our communities,” Cook said.

“[The] address ignored both the deep-seated economic challenges facing black Americans after decades of being locked out of opportunity as well as the intense damage wreaked by the recent federal government shutdown precipitated by this administration. Between the slowing of economic growth by an estimated 0.13 percentage points for each week of the shutdown to the overall $11 billion lost over the course of the historic 35 day closure, all our communities will continue to be harmed, with $3 billion in value lost forever.”

Comments

Bass and Cook are living in their pro-liberal anti-America world of lies and deceit. This economic turnaround is due to tax cuts by President Donald Trump. And blacks all over this country were complaining that Barak Obama did nothing to help blacks. As a matter of fact, many blacks said President Clinton, did far more for blacks than did Obama.
President Trump has by far exceeded Clinton?s efforts in just two years. Bass and Cook are delusional.
Posted on February 7, 2019
 
I am now an independent, after decades of being a Democrat. I voted for President Trump and probably will again in 2020. Great speech.
Posted on February 6, 2019
 

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