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The Voice of the Black Community

Life and Religion

Night of Giving fundraiser for historic Siloam School
Showcase for restoration, preservation
 
Published Wednesday, May 9, 2018 1:01 pm
by Ashley Mahoney

FILE PHOTO
The Siloam School, built in the early 20th century, is showcased in A Night of Giving May 10 at NASCAR Hall of Fame.

Preservation takes money.


A Night of Giving on May 10 from 7-10 p.m. at NASCAR Hall of Fame is designed to raise funds for the restoration and preservation of the historic Siloam Rosenwald School.

The House of Enix is one of several organizations that have joined the Charlotte Museum of History’s efforts to raise money to restore the structure. The museum took point on the project in 2017 with the intention of eventually relocating the building to their property, and restoring it for community use.
A collaboration between the museum and House of Enix, a nonprofit that raises awareness for projects like this, seemed like a natural fit. A Night of Giving marks the kick off of a six-month timeline with a fundraising target of $500,000.

“Once the event is over, that’s when we go after bigger conversations,” House of Enix founder Lu-Ann Barry said. “It sets the groundwork, and it sets the pace for the aggressiveness that we need to keep in pursuing the fundraising efforts. I went to the museum looking for a venue space, and that’s how I discovered the schoolhouse. I’ve created this six-month campaign because of the large sum of money that it will take, and the time that I think with a good strategy and a great team behind me, we can definitely make some inroads in hitting that target.”

While the schoolhouse was not built with Rosenwald grant money, it did follow that blueprint, and served as a primarily African American institution for several years. October marks the 101st anniversary of the Rosenwald Foundation’s incorporation, which would coincide with targeted completion of the fundraiser.

“The main focus is to bring awareness to the schoolhouse, because a lot of people didn’t realize what it was, or that it even existed,” Barry said. “When I saw it, I couldn’t turn by back on it.”

The project has become a promise for Barry, who met with James Young, a janitor at the schoolhouse, and his wife, Vera Young.

“Now it has become more of a personal mission, because yesterday I was very fortunate to speak with Mr. and Mrs. Young,” Barry said. “Mr. Young is one of the last surviving people linked to the Siloam Schoolhouse. When I spoke to them yesterday, she really expressed a strong love and appreciation for the fact that we are still at this, and still trying to bring the awareness and the funding to restore the school, and I promised her that I will do it.”

Comments

Although the school was built in the 20th century, To me it would be more important to leave it on it's original property. Because moving it will not be the same. Mr. James Young was employed there During that time in question, I feel he should be able to tell people about the school house. and I also feel that strongly that it should remain on it's original property. but I am just passing my opinion.
Posted on May 23, 2018
 

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