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The Voice of the Black Community

Local

Voter ID cards available
N.C. requires them starting in 2016
 
Published Monday, January 6, 2014 7:09 am
by Herbert L. White

North Carolina is now issuing voter identification cards.

The cards, which became available on Jan. 2, are free. Beginning in 2016, North Carolina voters will be required to produce a valid photo ID to cast a ballot in person. Until then, voters can cast a ballot without an ID.

A list of photo ID that will be acceptable for voting is available on the State Board of Elections’ website, ncbse.gov. No-fee ID cards are available for people who have no other valid forms of photo identification.

Applications for no-fee voter ID cards can be made at any DMV driver license office.

Applicants will need to present documents that verify their age and identity. Applicants will also need to provide a valid Social Security number.

NCDMV has posted the requirements and documents acceptable for the Voter ID card on its website, ncdot.gov.

Voter ID cards will be mailed to applicants within 10 to 15 days following application.

The Division of Motor Vehicles conducted five rehearsals and training sessions over the past three weeks for all examiners and information technology personnel are trained in procedures to issue voter identification to all North Carolinians.

 

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