Title















Site Registration | FInd a Copy | Event Calendar | Site Map | Search the Site
The Voice of the Black Community

News

More jobs, lower wages in N.C.
Low-wage boom in urban centers
 
Published Monday, October 7, 2013 7:25 am
by Stephanie Carson, N.C. News Service

RALEIGH – There are more jobs available in North Carolina's 14 metro areas, according to a report released this week from the NC Division of Employment Security, but the pay for most of those jobs falls $12 below the average state hourly wage.


Tazra Mitchell, a fellow with the N.C. Budget and Tax Center, said job growth in industries that don't keep people out of poverty is not the answer.


“There is a glimmer of hope in the unemployment data, but the bad news is that the majority of all job creation is occurring in industries that don't pay a living wage,” Mitchell said.


A living wage in North Carolina is between $10 and $12 an hour. In the last year, the leisure and hospitality industries were the fastest or second-fastest growing industries across all metro areas, but their average hourly wage is a little more than $8. The growth in low-wage jobs is matched with new census data that showed 18 percent of North Carolinians live in poverty, which is higher than the national average.


Mitchell said reducing the poverty rate and increasing hourly wages go hand in hand.


“These industries are paying ultra-low wages, so this explains the trend that we're seeing in persistently high poverty rates in the state and the prolonged deterioration in income,” she added.


?Census data also found that when figures are adjusted for inflation, North Carolinians are making less now than they were in 2000.

Comments

Leave a Comment


Send this page to a friend

Upcoming Events

read all
15

Blue Man Group

This group of silent blue men is best known for

20

Women in the Winner's Circle

Danica Patrick is far from the only female

21

How Did Testing Get Out of Control and What Can We Do About It?

We invite you to a meeting to discuss the current

Latest News

read all

Rubin 'Hurricane' Carter dies

Wrongly-convicted boxer freed in 1985

JCSU women win CIAA track

Golden Bulls' third title in four years

Top Seniors at 40:

The Post's Top Seniors program would not exist without James Cuthbertson. In 1975, Cuthbertson, then a Post reporter, asked a question: Why weren't African American students acknowledged publicly for academic and extracurricular accomplishments? The answer was to create Top Seniors, an annual list of all-star scholars celebrating its 40th class in 2014.