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Parks aspires to earn NBA shot
Former J.C. Smith standout wants summer league try
 
Published Thursday, June 27, 2013 7:47 am
by Herbert L. White

 

Trevin Parks knows he’s short for a basketball player. It’s also his fuel to succeed at a big man’s game.

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PHOTO/CURTIS WILSON
Johnson C. Smith graduate Trevin Parks, who averaged 25 points per game last season, wants to earn a spot on an NBA Summer League roster if he isn’t drafted.


The former Johnson C. Smith All-America is trying to get his foot in the door of an NBA career. This month, he’s auditioned for Orlando, Charlotte and Brooklyn in preparation for the June 27 Draft. Although the 5-11 guard likely won’t have his name called, Parks’ goal is to get an invitation to a Summer League roster, made up primarily of rookies and undrafted free agents.


“I’m not hanging my hat on draftability,” the Hickory native said. “I know (the chances are) slim to none that I’ll get drafted, but I’m really working hard on getting a contract offer. I’m definitely trying to play on a Summer League team with one of teams I worked out for or a team that’s looking for a point guard of my caliber.”


Parks was one of the best players in Division II, earning All-America status in each of his three seasons at JCSU as well as being named CIAA player of the year. He averaged 25 points per game as a senior, but at the NBA level, coaches aren’t putting stock in college kudos.


“Getting awards and accolades are great, but at the pre-draft workouts everybody was the man or a great player in college,” Parks said. “There were more All-Americans than me. I don’t carry (honors) into workouts to give me strength or get me through. I prepare, I work out hard and I’m a prayer warrior. I just leave everything up to God.”


Parks admits to a case of jitters, especially before the first workout in Orlando, but the Bobcats’ coaches put him at ease about the process. Auditioning was less complicated with some encouragement.


“You’re always going to have a couple of nerves in your body,” Parks said. “Anybody who tells you they weren’t, I don’t think they’re a basketball player, but as far as going into a professional environment coming from a collegiate level, that’s where the nerves kick in.
“Everybody knows you can play the game of basketball. That’s why you’re there at the pre-draft workouts. There’s different levels to basketball and I’m determined to take on every obstacle to make sure that I go to the highest level of basketball, which is the professional level.”


That’s why Parks is so eager to make an impression. Skills can open doors, but intangibles can solidify an opportunity – perhaps on draft night.


“I went into every workout with a chip on my shoulder and I’ve been playing with it for a while because people think I’m too small to actually play the game of basketball,” he said. “But when you look at the game now, you have a lot of short guards that I’m seeing eye to eye with. It’s a matter of determination and heart.”

 

Comments

hard work and dedication keep pushing and keep grinding at the end of the tunnel is the light. the boy works hard you gunna get there my brother stay in prayer keep god first.
Posted on June 30, 2013
 

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