Title















Site Registration | FInd a Copy | Event Calendar | Site Map | Search the Site
The Voice of the Black Community

News

Retired judge Clifton Johnson dies at age 67
Was first black to serve as senior associate on N.C. Court of Appeals
 
Published Friday, June 26, 2009 10:50 am
by Herbert L. White

Johnson

Clifton E. Johnson, a Charlotte attorney who broke barriers in North Carolina’s judicial ranks died June 25 in Asheville.

He was 67.


Mr. Johnson, a retired senior associate judge on the N.C. Court of Appeals, was attending a conference in Asheville when he became ill.


Mr. Johnson earned several firsts, culminating with his tenure on the appeals court, where he was the second black judge to sit on the panel. Mr. Johnson was elected to N.C. Superior Court in 1978, the first black to hold the position since Reconstruction, then was appointed to the Court of Appeals in 1982 by then-Gov. James B. Hunt. He was elected later that year to a full term and re-elected in 1990 before retiring in 1996 as senior associate judge, the first African American to attain the position.


A Martin County, N.C., native Mr. Johnson earned undergraduate and law degrees from N.C. Central University in Durham and was the first black lawyer to be appointed an assistant prosecutor in North Carolina.


Mr. Johnson was appointed to Mecklenburg County’s District Court in 1969, and later became chief District Court judge, both firsts.

Comments

Leave a Comment


Send this page to a friend

Upcoming Events

read all
15

Blue Man Group

This group of silent blue men is best known for

20

Women in the Winner's Circle

Danica Patrick is far from the only female

21

How Did Testing Get Out of Control and What Can We Do About It?

We invite you to a meeting to discuss the current

Latest News

read all

Rubin 'Hurricane' Carter dies

Wrongly-convicted boxer freed in 1985

JCSU women win CIAA track

Golden Bulls' third title in four years

Top Seniors at 40:

The Post's Top Seniors program would not exist without James Cuthbertson. In 1975, Cuthbertson, then a Post reporter, asked a question: Why weren't African American students acknowledged publicly for academic and extracurricular accomplishments? The answer was to create Top Seniors, an annual list of all-star scholars celebrating its 40th class in 2014.