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The Voice of the Black Community

Health

Study links sleep apnea, dim light, depression
Research suggests sleep in very dark rooms
 
Published Saturday, September 7, 2013 1:00 pm
by Michaela L. Duckett

It is estimated that half of the 12 million Americans with obstructive sleep apnea also struggle with depression. Could the prescription be as simple as sleeping in a very dark room?

Research suggests that is a possibility.

Scientists at Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center have found that exposure to dim light at night can interact with sleep apnea and lead to increased levels of depression and anxiety in mice.

 “Although it is unclear at the present time whether sleep apnea causes depression, both conditions are commonly seen together in patients,” said Dr. Ulysses Magalang, director of Ohio State’s Sleep Disorders Center and a co-author of the study. “Our research suggests that sleeping even with a minimum amount of light may increase symptoms of depression in those with sleep apnea.”

The study, which was recently posted online by the American Journal of Physiology, involved mice that were placed in sleep apnea-like conditions, mimicking the repetitive lowering of oxygen levels experienced by sleep apnea patients. Half were kept in normal lighting conditions during the day and total darkness at night. The other half was exposed to dim light at night using a 40-watt light bulb in the lab. The group in dim light had higher anxiety behaviors and more depressive behaviors than the mice kept in the dark environment. Scientists also observed impaired learning and memory among both sets of mice.

“Not only were these changes observed during field and maze tests, but we also recorded physical changes, including a reduction of cell size in the hippocampus, an area of the brain important in memory and spatial navigation,” said Taryn Aubrecht, first author of the study and a neuroscience graduate student at Ohio State.

Obstructive sleep apnea is a common problem, especially among smokers and people who are overweight. The disorder is linked to high blood pressure, diabetes and higher risk of stroke and heart failure. The most common signs include loud snoring, daytime sleepiness, irritability and memory problems.

“The combination of dim light exposure and sleep apnea appears to result in increased depressive and anxiety-like behaviors in mice,” Magalang said. “So limiting exposure to light at night could be a very simple strategy to help patients with sleep apnea. We’re currently exploring further human testing.”

Magalang offers these suggestions for improving sleep and reducing dim light exposure at night:

• Use room-darkening drapes or shades on windows to block outside light from traffic, streetlights and neighboring buildings.

• Turn off the television, computer or other electronic devices before going to sleep.

• Choose clocks or nightlights with red lighting instead of blue or green.

 

 

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