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The Voice of the Black Community

Arts and Entertainment

Regional Artist Project Grant Applications Available
Eligible artists can apply for up to $2,000
 
Published Tuesday, July 16, 2013
by Staff Reports

The Arts & Science Council has made applications available for the Regional Artist Project Grant. Applications must be submitted by noon on Sept. 19 and can be found at ArtsandScience.org.

RAPG grants provide funds of up to $2,000 for individuals and groups of unincorporated artists to pursue projects that further improve their artistic development by attending a professional advancement experience or purchasing/renting a piece of equipment. 

“The Regional Artist Project Grant program provides artists with opportunities that enhance their abilities and expand their artistic reach, which benefits the recipients and the communities in which they live,” said ASC Interim President & Chief Innovation Officer Robert Bush.

The grant is available to artists in all disciplines. Artists on the staff of one of the participating arts councils or artists who received a RAPG within the last two calendar years (2012 and later) are not eligible to apply.

The RAPG is administered and funded by ASC, in partnership with the arts councils in Cabarrus, Cleveland, Gaston, Iredell, Rowan, Rutherford, Union, and York (S.C.) counties, as well as the North Carolina Arts Council and the Blumenthal Endowment.

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