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Posted by The Charlotte Post on Monday, March 7, 2016

Life and Religion

ET, phone home?
 
Published Thursday, February 19, 2009
by Kimberly Harrington, For The Charlotte Post

Yes, Virginia, there are UFOs.

Harrington


While I don’t go around looking for Unidentified Flying Objects or concern myself with a piece of an alien spaceship spiraling down and striking me in the head at 117,000 mph, I do entertain the idea that we are not alone.


As the 1997 movie “Contact” suggested, “if we are alone, that’s an awful lot of wasted space.”


The recent fireball - or whatever it was - that cameraman Eddie Garcia filmed in Austin, Texas, has brought heightened attention to what lingers in outer space. I’ve never seen a strange object in the sky with my own eyes, but I believe there is more to life than us humans on Earth.


And I’m not alone in that thought. Thirty-four percent of people polled in recent years believe in UFOs, equaling to about 100 million Americans.
There are too many unexplained appearances – and disappearances for that matter. There are hundreds of cases. Sometimes when people disappear and are never heard from again; when there’s no clue of there whereabouts, I often wonder if they were abducted by extraterrestrial beings. (Read up on the 1961 abduction of Betty and Barney Hill.)


Then there’s the most famous UFO case, which occurred in Roswell, New Mexico, the heart and soul of ufology. In 1947, a sheep rancher found crash debris that was later announced by the Air Force as a flying saucer. The government would later recant its story and say it was the remnants of a weather balloon, but countless witnesses came forward declaring otherwise.


This “thing” that was filmed in Austin was first believed to be debris from two satellites that collided in space, but recent reports say it has been deemed a natural phenomenon or a meteor. At this point, pick your own theory.


The two satellites that did collide were destroyed upon impact and the resulting debris could circle the Earth for tens of thousands of years. More of these types of collisions are likely as the number of satellites increase due to mobile phone networks and satellite navigation system in cars.
Subsequently, more of this “debris” could be headed to Earth and who knows where it could land. It could be on top of your house or worse, on top of your head.


In the meantime, while the United Nations is trying to protect us from the sky falling, it would be wise to not think we are alone in this world.
E-mail Kimberly Harrington at onyxlyspeaking@yahoo.com

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